It’s time for convergence in the Scrum community!

As of last night Scrum Alliance, Scrum.org, and Scrum Inc. announced the release and joint endorsement of a new community website, ScrumGuides.org. The new website is the official source of “The Scrum Guide, The Definitive Guide to Scrum: The Rules of the Game.”

“It’s time for convergence in the Scrum community” David Starr Scrum.org

The press releases can be found in these three places:

The fact that there are three places that had to announce this is a clue to why this could turn out to be a big deal. Over the last 5 years there has been a fracturing of the scrum community starting in 2009 with Ken Schwaber leaving the Scrum Alliance “out of extreme dissatisfaction with the state of the art” to form Scrum.org. He gave his reasons here: https://www.scrum.org/About/Origins

Following that, slight nuances began to spring up between each side of the schism’s definitions of just about everything. The bulk was the same, the message was almost certainly not deliberately different, but when you’re doing this day in day out those slight difference can make a big impact in how you go about your work. Plus it’s amazing how hung up Agilists can be over the exact definition of a single word.

Down the road further versions of things started springing up (that neither side seemed happy with), this further dilution of what scrum means seems to be behind the reconciliation.  Edit: following Ron Jeffries post http://xprogramming.com/articles/scrum-alliance-scrum-inc-scrum-org-agree-on-common-definition/ it now looks like it’s more of a deliberate reconciliation 

Their will inevitably be upcoming revisions of the scrum guide, presumably to iron out the subtleties, so we’ll be watching out for updates and the impact they’ll have on our community. We’ll also be looking out to see if this is another step in the rise of Scrum’s popularity or if this is a sign that Scrum has peaked. As one of our scrum masters at Macmillan Science and Education put it: “when a market consolidates, it’s usually a sign that product is now mainstream and no longer considered innovative”, who knows… but I’ll be keen to find out!

Originally published on my internal blog at Macmillan.com
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